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Hearing Voices In Your Head? Auditory Hallucinations: Causes, Types, & Treatments

Hearing voices in your head, or experiencing auditory hallucinations does not always mean that you have mental illness. Many people have reported hearing voices that do not cause any kind of problem in their life. Some of these voices are generally positive or contain positive messages. According to research, only about 33% of people that experience auditory hallucinations require psychiatric treatment due to mental illness. For the large percentage of individuals that hear voices, they report that these voices offer inspiration and support.

Regardless of whether these voices offer support or pose a threat to someone, people usually start hearing them following some sort of traumatic experience. Roughly 70% of individuals that hear voices notice them after physical or sexual abuse, death of a loved one, and/or a major accident. These voices are seen by some experts as a psychological coping mechanism that the brain created to help deal with major stress.

Some experts suggest that the more negative the trauma, the more likely the voices will consist of negative threats. However, there are plenty of people that have learned to live comfortably with their voices – many people embrace them. Brain scans have been able to show that when people report hearing voices, the same areas that process sound and store memories appear to be active. The exact brain activity during an auditory hallucination can differ among individuals, but in general, areas involving memory and auditory processing seem to be operating simultaneously.

What Causes Auditory Hallucinations? The Reasons You Hear Voices In Your Head.

It is a common misconception to automatically assume that if you are hearing voices in your head, you are experiencing a schizophrenic hallucination. Although voices are among positive symptoms experienced during schizophrenia, there are other reasons that people hear voices besides mental illness. Only when the voices persist as being unpleasant, negative, and destructive are they usually considered a sign of a psychotic break.

  1. Brain Damage / Injury: If you experienced any brain damage as a result of an accident or medical condition, the damage could cause you to hear voices. Many people report hearing spiritual voices after being involved in serious accidents. Regardless of what type of voices you hear, it is likely a result of damage to the brain.
  2. Bullying: Often times people that are heavily bullied growing up end up with various mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and feel inadequate. Intense bullying can lead to the individual hearing voices because they have become so traumatized and feel awful about themselves. This is especially common if you are only a child and don’t have the necessary coping skills to deal with bullying. Your brain simply breaks with reality, and voices can be a way in which some people cope.
  3. Death of a Loved One: If you have lost someone very close to you (e.g. a family member), you may hear voices related to their death and/or may even experience communication with them. Some people report that during the early days of bereavement and grief processing, this is the only way that they can mentally cope with the loss.
  4. Drugs: There are many drugs that can lead to you hearing voices. Most drugs that affect the brain and levels of various neurotransmitters can result in auditory hallucinations. You may hear voices after taking drugs or during a period of withdrawal from the drug. A relatively common example is for people who experience Adderall-induced psychosis. In most cases, once the drug is out of your system, the voices should subside. However, consistent long term drug use may damage the brain enough to lead to conditions like schizophrenia and/or psychosis.
  5. Hypnogogic Hallucinations: Many individuals hear voices when they fall asleep and/or are just waking up from a dream. This has to do with your brain activity either entering and/or coming out of a dream state. When you fall asleep, your brain waves change to the slower theta range and random dreams occur. Most people that hear voices following a dream or before sleep may hear sounds or voices call their name. Most people report very brief sounds while experiencing these hallucinations. Some people report visual hallucinations that accompany their auditory hallucinations as well.
  6. Isolation: Anyone that becomes isolated from social contact for long enough may start to hear voices. This often happens with castaways, sailors, and individuals that cut themselves off from society for extended periods of time. It is thought that hearing voices are in some ways a compensation for lack of interaction as a result of being isolated. This may be more common than we think among individuals in solitary confinement.
  7. Mental Illness: Individuals with mental illness may experience voices that are threatening and very negative in nature. These voices may be difficult to deal with and may really scare the person hearing them. Common illnesses that result in people hearing voices include: psychosis, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dissociative identity disorder (DID) and major depression with psychotic features.
  8. Physical Illness: Individuals dealing with a severe physical illness may experience delirium and may become disorientated with their surroundings. If you experience a high fever and are really sick, it is possible that this could lead to experiencing auditory hallucinations. The body is likely in an extreme state of stress and is trying to recover from the sickness – which could lead to hearing voices.
  9. PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder): Various traumatic experiences such as natural disasters, being victim of a crime, and/or serving as a soldier may result in post-traumatic stress disorder. Some people actually hear voices and/or hallucinate as a result of this disorder. Although not everyone with this condition hears voices, it is not an uncommon experience.
  10. Sexual Abuse / Physical Abuse: Anyone that has been sexually or physically abused may end up hearing voices. The younger the age of abuse, the more likely voices entered your head as a result of what happened. You may hear the voice of the abuser in your head and you may not know how to cope with it.
  11. Sleep Deprivation: Going considerable periods of time without proper sleep can result in hallucinations. Anyone with significant lack of sleep could end up hallucinating. This is one of the prominent symptoms of prolonged sleep deprivation. Researchers hypothesize that it could be related to neurons composing the I-function in the brain. This leads to production of a dissimilar reality and the pressure on the neurons from lack of sleep attempt to create something even though they are burnt out. Since the neurons are under significant duress from lack of restoration that would accompany sleep, brain activity becomes sporadic and incoherent – resulting in psychosis-like symptoms.
  12. Spiritual Experiences: Certain individuals hear voices in their head as a result of spiritual experiences. Some people report hearing spirits / spirit guides, angels, “God,” sages, mystics, and deceased loved ones. This shows that there is a fine line between hearing voices as a result of a spiritual experience and voices as a result of mental illness. Other people hear voices of evil spirits in cases of a haunting.
  13. Starvation: If you are starving and have not eaten properly for a prolonged period of time, you may hear voices. Once again, your brain is malnourished and burnt out. It has no energy stores and attempts to function to the best of its ability. Some individuals diagnosed with anorexia have been found to hear voices as a result of food deprivation.
  14. Stress: Some people report hearing voices as a result of significant stress. Anyone under major amounts of mental stress for a prolonged period could potentially experience an auditory hallucination. In regards to stress, we are not talking about your average stress from work, we are talking about a cumulative build up of major stress.

Types of voices that you may hear

  • Controlling voices – Voices may attempt to control how you act. They may tell you to engage in negative behavior.
  • Multiple voices – You may hear more than one voice in your head and they may be conflicting or fighting with each other.
  • Spiteful voices – Negative, cruel, nasty, vindictive voices often accompany mental illness.
  • Supportive voices – Many people experience support from the voices that they hear.
  • Random voices – Some people may hear random, meaningless voices. In other words, the voices heard aren’t necessarily controlling, negative, or supportive – they are completely random.

Notes: Voices typically call out your name. They are common to hear when no one else is around. Some people experience the voices as being inside their head. Others experience voices as coming from an external source in the environment. You may believe that you are hearing other people’s thoughts. Voices may increase in loudness (volume) if you are highly stressed.

How to stop hearing voices in your head OR cope with them

  • Learn to live with them – If the voices are positive, people can learn to live with them. Even if they are negative, people can learn psychological coping techniques.
  • Medications – Various types of antipsychotic medications are used if the voices are a result of psychosis or schizophrenia. These tend to be pretty darn effective at reducing frequency of and/or eliminating hallucinations.
  • Reframing – Some therapists are helping patients learn how to “reframe” the voices that they hear. This is done by bringing the voices to conscious awareness and recognizing that they are merely a symptom and aren’t based in reality. The goal is to help people get comfortable with the voices because usually if the person gets stressed out, the voices increase in intensity.
  • Trans-magnetic stimulation (TMS) – Researchers have found that TMS helps quiet voices by suppressing auditory and acoustic hallucinations for a 90 day (3 month) period. This type of therapy involves decreasing brain activity in specific regions using magnetic fields. Areas of the brain that are typically targeted are usually those involved in speech processing.

Should the voices be eliminated? Only if bothersome.

If the voices are not negative in nature, there’s not usually a need to silence them. However, if they are swearing, pressuring, and/or attempting to control a person, psychological help is highly recommended. Usually there are a couple different types of individuals when it comes to hearing voices. There are those people who hear voices and they do not interrupt a person’s social life and experiences and there are individuals who hear voices that evoke a negative, fearful response. These are the voices that need to be reduced and/or eradicated.

Have you ever heard voices in your head?

What was the experience like? Was the voice supportive or mean? When did you first hear a voice? Was it a single voice or multiple voices? Just know that you are not alone in your experience and you are not necessarily going crazy either. Many people hear voices on a daily basis – some can be positive, some could be highly vindictive, while others can be completely random. Feel free to share your personal experience in the comments section below.

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{ 41 comments… add one }

  • Sherwin Marcelle August 16, 2014, 8:44 pm

    In 2009… I got into an accident. I can’t say if I was conscious or not but what I do remember were voices saying he isn’t ready as yet send him back he still has work to do. I don’t believe in Gods or spirits I summed it up as a result of head trauma. The thing which surprised me the most is the fact now that solving stuff no matter how complicated has become so easy for me… Whether it be formula based or not.

  • Wendy Roehrich October 7, 2014, 8:04 am

    My 82 year old mother periodically insists there is a choir walking down our street or outside her window. They always stop singing at midnight. She insists she is not having auditory hallucinations. Her naturopath thinks that it is some kind of spiritual experience before death. I see spiritual experience is on your list. I will have to rethink this.

  • Bruce December 10, 2014, 4:18 pm

    January 1st, 2004 I was awakened three separate times by a loud voice in my bedroom that said, “Bruce! You’re having a stroke!” I wish I would have taken action immediately and gone to the hospital the first time I heard the voice. When I did, later that day, I was admitted to the hospital with a stroke. It did permanent damage that affects my life still today. When the voice woke me up telling me I was having the stroke there was still time for “clot-busting” drugs to be effective and prevent permanent damage.

  • Kevin January 11, 2015, 2:02 pm

    Still up to this day I hear voices in my house. My father and mother say there isn’t something here. But it’s like ‘it’s’ watching me. Peeking after each corner. Watching every move. All the while telling me “Brace yourself.” It’s like something bad is going to happen. But I still don’t know which I have. I’ve tried meditating a few times. And I can’t live with them cause they come at the most inappropriate times.

  • Jamie January 11, 2015, 2:36 pm

    As I fall asleep, I tend to hear multiple voices in my head. Sometimes they may say my name, or something completely random. Sometimes they can actually be really loud and I get scared and wake up a little bit. This has only been happening for a few months now, though.

    • Sam March 12, 2015, 7:28 pm

      This has been happening to me too. I sometimes wake fully up and look for the people who are talking. Only to find no-one there. Have you ever had visual hallucinations too?

  • Joe February 9, 2015, 9:00 am

    For a couple of years as I fall asleep my ears race with overlapping sounds and voices which seem oddly familiar to me, as if they are randoms samples from things I have heard in the past week. Rarely can I latch onto actual phrases because there is just so much sound, like three or four TV news channels on at once. Usually I ignore it and just fade into sleep, but sometimes it is so vivid I cannot sleep and have to drink some wine or get extremely tired to fall asleep. I have been under tremendous stress and am probably depressed. I worry this is a sign of a slipping mental state but it only happens as I fall asleep and I am relieved to know many people experience this with no ill effect.

    • Kol September 5, 2015, 1:35 am

      I’ve experienced this as well. Most of the time, mine argue to the point of screaming and something tends to break. It’s almost always when I’m unsettled or upset.

  • Frank Figueroa February 22, 2015, 8:07 am

    I hear voices, one really. It used to cause me physical pain! I’m not kidding. It would talk to me. Threaten me all the time, I had no control, no Will of my own. It made me put a knife to my chest & ordered me to stick it in. I knew what I was doing, but could not control it. I found out by getting angry at it! It could no longer control me. It said to me how did you do that? I control you! I could hear my daughter in trouble, I’d go looking for her! That’s how strong this thing was. Its been 13 years now since this voice came into my life, no meds could help! I’ve been on them all. I tried to kill myself a few times, came close too. I still hear this voice, but I just live with it now. It’s a living hell! But there’s nothing I can do to stop it. Believe me I tried. Good luck to all that have to live with this as I do.

  • liam lonnie February 23, 2015, 11:40 am

    I suffer from pretty bad anxiety and over the last couple of weeks I have been experiencing voices as I’ve been trying to get to sleep. There is a history of schizophrenia in my family, which has had me scared that I’m getting it as well. The voices are usually totally random small conversations or loud noises and once I openy eyes they stop. I don’t really experience any other symptoms and feel totally fine through the day but the thought of going to sleep is really starting to scare me. Does anyone have any thoughts or advice? Thanks.

  • keith March 1, 2015, 5:14 pm

    I’ve been really stressed lately from a lot of different angles. Last night I was experiencing a state of being sleep and awake at the same time which is pretty common for me. Sometimes I see things in the closet or behind the door or under the bed. But last night was the first time I heard actual voices. I thought it was my girlfriend, but it didn’t sound like her and I figured it had to be. The voice told me to get up and open the Windows. It’s like 10 degrees here. I finally woke up and asked her “what’d you say” and she insisted that she hadn’t said anything. It scared me. I also hear loud footsteps sometimes and those really creep me the f*ck out!

  • Rosera March 22, 2015, 7:07 am

    Every time I get very stressed or very upset, I could hear a voice tell me to calm down and wake up. So far, that voice is still inside my head but she will only lecture me on lack of priorities and poor social interaction. When I calmed down, the voice lessens. Only time when I am calm that she still speaks is the harsh comments of the people I meet. Those she didn’t like, which is very awkward and I had to ask why… So far no answer.

    • Reji September 3, 2015, 1:12 pm

      It could be an auditory manifestation of your deep subconscious. Auditory manifestation meaning the thoughts of your subconscious could physically be heard by you. Like, maybe your inner subconscious is communicating with you how to assess yourself. Perhaps deep in yourself, those harsh comments you hear could be what you truly think of that person. To me that sounds like a more advanced case of “gut instinct”, a natural feeling we get towards people we’ve never met (being able to gauge whether they “feel” friendly or nasty, without knowing a thing about them) or having a feeling towards a situation or future events.

      If the voice is making harsh comments, then you should follow up with it. e.g, If it calls someone a bitch or manipulative, then ask that person something or do a suggestive action that would indirectly expose them as bitchy or manipulative. But if its something like “that purse is terrible” then maybe that purse IS just terrible.

  • fernanda May 14, 2015, 7:30 pm

    My brother hears voices, but these voices could be only one or two different beings. He says they are demons or spirits, that they try to cause him pain or illness. These voices he hears also tell him that there is a secret base in Chiapas, MX where all these holy people that pray all day are there and these demons want him to go there. He constantly says these voices tell him the truth about life and so on – and that everybody’s thoughts are provoked or sent by the demons. He says the demons are our thoughts that makes us think. (Some demons are good and some bad). I hope I could find a cure for him. He does not want to go to the doctor to get evaluated.

  • Gina Love May 21, 2015, 4:12 am

    I talk to God every day. And He talks back to me every day. We have long, interactive conversations. In the pages of books and magazines. I don’t usually hear auditory hallucinations. Although I have many times. Usually multiple random voices outside my head. I’ve also had visual, olfactory, tactile, and gustatory hallucinations. When God talks to me, He speaks to me through the pages of prayer books, magazines and the Bible. Actually, any written materiel will do for God. I guess my Dr. would call this phenomenon “delusions of reference”. But, I feel it is real. I have a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

  • Prabhu May 29, 2015, 9:37 pm

    1 Month before I heard 2 Voices of a known people. they scared me a lot like they are inside me. I was unable to reach them directly. I thought they were dead and they’ve came to me after they die. They both are husband and wife. They threatened me a lot. Finally I went to hospital and took some psychological treatment and now I am alright and I don’t hear any more voices.

  • Karen June 2, 2015, 10:02 pm

    I was prescribed Avelox, Tetracycline and Nexium by Dr. D.C. on May 1, 2014. Soon after, I started hearing singing and chanting which I have never experienced before. A nurse told me that some medications can cause a psychotic reaction. I googled and also contacted Bayer who makes Avelox. They tell me that with some patients, just one tablet can cause a psychotic reaction and some symptoms are irreversible. I was prescribed various anti-psychotics, but none have worked.

    Instead, I ended up with very unpleasant side effects. I am at my wit’s end. I have stopped taking anti-psychotics and considering taking Vitamin B3, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C and Zinc citrate as I hear that the treatment may help. However, I cannot find a psychiatrist that practice orthomolecular psychiatry in Victoria. Does anyone out there knows of a psychiatrist that practice orthomolecular psychiatry? Thank you.

  • Bob Kramer June 3, 2015, 11:15 pm

    I have two rings of voices around my head. The inner one is all the negative stuff – the stuff that says “you are a dead man” the first time you look in the mirror in the morning. The “I need to die now,” “someone please shoot me,” “I need to vanish” stuff rarely goes away for any extended time. What’s odd is that it seems to be me that is talking, not some external party. While that track spends time discussing suicide, I think of it as greatly wearying rather than compelling.

    I’m bipolar. Is this what you mean by hearing voices? The outer ring is more repeats/tunings of conversations I have had or imagined having. When there are many conversations running with high repeat counts and repeated slicing and dicing of word order, I can barely see the external world through all the cacophony. But again, no one is giving me orders. Would you call that hearing voices? Thanks!

    • Gina L. June 8, 2015, 1:28 pm

      No, I’m afraid that what you describe is NOT the same as “hearing voices”, or auditory hallucinations. What you describe is your own voice in your head. Auditory hallucinations are someone else’s voice in your head!

  • Emmy June 4, 2015, 12:13 pm

    When I’m alone and think of something, another “person” joins the conversation. They may not say anything relevant to the things I’m thinking about, they just start to speak. It feels like someone would be speaking right next to me, but of course there is no one there. When I’m trying to sleep I can hear someone calling my name distantly. After that the voice starts speaking. It doesn’t feel like they’re speaking to me directly, but as if I would be listening to a conversation between two people from a small distance.

    The conversation doesn’t usually make sense at all. It’s very stressful, and it really scares me. It has been happening for as long as I can remember, but recently it has become more and more common for the voices to start. I have been wanting to talk about it to my psychiatrist but I fear that he’d say that I have schizophrenia. I haven’t told about the voices to anyone yet, but it felt quite good to share it here.

    • Shay September 25, 2015, 6:58 pm

      Hello Emmy, I have been googling this topic and came across your comment. It seems to be the closest thing to my experience! This just started happening a week ago and I have heard these two entities stressfully arguing twice now! I have no idea what to make of it! Have you heard more or read more about this specific type of thing?! I am very curious and looking for insight! Thanks, Shay

  • CrazyGirl1960 June 8, 2015, 1:40 pm

    I don’t hear voices often because I’m on a great medication regimen. But, when I do, it’s usually because I’m either physically sick, or under severe stress. I don’t get depressed either, due to good meds. And, I’ve finally got the hypomania under control, which for years, I was unfortunately unaware of. Oh happy days!

  • Elliot June 9, 2015, 8:47 pm

    I’ve heard voices since I was 10, I’m on medication that helps a bit, they often stop if I’m reading, so I’ve been doing that more. I think before you try medication, you should search for something that stops them, as most people suffering from psychosis report they stop during some activities. They are quite frightening sometimes, but getting them under control is so amazing! This article was so informative, I love that ‘spiritual experience’ is listed!

  • Cant think June 12, 2015, 9:45 pm

    Hello. Today I have realized that I hear an aggressive voice inside my head. this voice is filled with anger. And hateful words towards myself which brings myself esteem down. I may have no trauma affect or accident. But one of my reasons were mentioned and it was the isolation. I admit that I don’t have any real friends to hang out. I don’t trust too easily. also I get so jealous by my younger sister who is the opposite.

    She is fun loving and beautiful and has many friends to go out with and I am like a nobody. I have read so many reasons as to why we hear these voices and I still don’t know how can I live with it. I can’t it is so destructive and it makes me so aggressive towards the people that I love. They don’t understand why I am so mean sometimes. I have lost some good friends because of this. I don’t think isolation alone is the reason… I think bullying too. So should I tell my mom about this or I can heal by myself?

    • Cindy September 3, 2015, 6:08 am

      Yes, please tell your mother about this. Hopefully she will get you some help from a doctor or a counselor. Good Luck!

  • Cheri July 6, 2015, 5:46 pm

    Lately I’ve been hearing things mostly at night in my head. Last night I had a major panic attack, and immediately after, started hearing several voices, people murmuring in my head-which then turned into deep sobbing and moaning. My head felt cloudy & disoriented, & my body was stiff yet violently trembling from fear. Is this “normal” for people with bipolar disorder to experience?

  • Sara July 12, 2015, 1:49 am

    I want to comment here because I do sometimes get random head voices saying unconnected things before I go to sleep. Usually it will sound a bit like my mum saying my name. This is common for a lot of people, and I get it more if I am very late going to bed. One morning, however, as I was waking up, a random voice in my head said “You’re going to die next week!”

    Of course, hearing a voice in my head saying that, made me worry about death for the whole of the following week. But I’m still here. The sinister voice was simply a very brief nightmare. So the best advice I can give to anyone who gets odd head voices before going to sleep, or when waking up, remember, it’s just a fragment of a dream or a nightmare. You could listen to quiet spa music through headphones to shut it out and meditate your way to peaceful sleep. The soul lives inside the brain, but the brain is also like a very complicated computer.

    If it’s over tired, it will malfunction and throw out confusing signals, as it mulls over what you’ve been doing the day before. And if you don’t have much self-love, your head voices might start to sound like enemies, when you are really simply annoyed with yourself. So tell yourself you are loved by angels and your loved ones. Try to build confidence, get to bed earlier, read and listen to calming music, and just like magic, the random head voices will shut up. I hope this might help someone. And if you believe in God, wear a cross to bed. It may seem like a spiritual placebo, but it will reinforce feelings of being safe at night.

  • Lori July 13, 2015, 4:23 am

    I’ve heard voices in multiple instances, usually when very tired or while trying to fall asleep, which is VERY difficult… :/ When I experience them, they sound as though they’re coming from a separate entity, whispering audibly into my ear. Tonight, the voice I heard whispered “All you have to face, is him”, repeatedly. I don’t get it… Whenever I have auditory or visual hallucinations, it’s always at night, whether I’m exhausted or not. I just wanted to get this off my chest… I can’t talk to anyone.

    • Reji September 3, 2015, 1:32 pm

      I can understand that. Talking to someone else you know about it can feel embarrassing or outright out of the question sometimes. My opinion for you is to mentally (and audibly) question this voice. Questions like, “Who are you talking about?”, “Who are you?”, “Why are you telling me this?”, “May you tell me more?” If you haven’t already, It’s best to follow the repeated whisper with a repeated response. Alternatively, you could meditate and even practice Astral Projection. You could find the answer you’re looking for.

  • Samantha Watts July 19, 2015, 7:10 pm

    I’ve heard hurried whispering at random points in my life ever since I was younger. Nothing traumatic has happened to me, as far as a I know. I can never make out what they say and I can go months without hearing anything from them. Most of the time I just ignore them. I’m 18.

  • Stevie July 22, 2015, 4:24 am

    I read in an article in New Scientist in recent years that talked about recent research that showed many people experience the odd voice once in a while. Minor brief episodes. I can’t remember if such episodes where more than the odd word or phrase in a month or year. I suppose rundown castaways of old might have paranoidly thought there could be something there and start hearing more of it. It would be great if such research could be included here.

    • Stevie July 22, 2015, 5:24 am

      I hear a lot of talk about voices or God and spirits in these things. I have talked to many Christians over the years. In the Bible it talks about the still small voice, a gentle whisper. In modern times Christians describe what sounds like an interactive inclination, a revelatory knowing in other words. It might be interactive or not. All very subtle, non grandiose.

      Of course there is the all encompassing voice of God experiences but this is rare to rare people. If there is anything in between, I don’t know of it. I suppose I shouldn’t mention it, we will probably get a spate of people suddenly convinced they hear whispers. But it is useful to know how different “real” religious experience may differ from the delusion. The ‘functional’ and the logic defying ‘dysfunctional’.

      On the flip side of the above, I have heard that so called ‘demonic’ spirits, can impersonate peoples thoughts misleading them, and a person without these tends to not have audible thoughts but feels and acts independently. The feelings of course are not out of ordinary but are regular responses. A still silent observant mind so to speak. The subject area is interesting, as it is revealed that even desires, feelings and inclinations are affected.

      But I have heard of instance that confronting such thinking based voice as to what it is, can quickly lead to a prolonged period of much escalated harassment in face of such denying, before it falls silent in the long-term. I personally don’t doubt there are hardwired reactions that lead to hearing voices/cross talk in the brain. But why isn’t a goal to eliminate the voices.

      Surely, as with the ‘demon’ example above, and neuro-plasticity of mind retraining, it is possible in certain limited cases to train your mind to ignore and suppress the voices, to close them down as you do with any thought, on a permanent basis despite the physical problems that cause them.

  • Artemis July 29, 2015, 8:18 am

    I remember having a voice in my head from the age of 3 . I don’t really remember when it stopped, nor do I know why it suddenly stopped. I was about 8.. or 9. I’m not sure. I thought it was completely normal. The voice was not much of a negative one, it was more like the opposite of me. She would have an opinion about every single thing I said or did. And we would fight. She didn’t really like me, but I liked her.

    Even though whenever I prayed she would interrupt me or say something stupid. And when I thought someone reads my mind she would start saying embarrassing stuff. I was mostly a positive person and she was a negative. I believe she might have become a part of me because right now I’m acting and thinking like she would. Could that even be possible?

  • LC July 29, 2015, 7:01 pm

    I take and have been taking Adderall for my ADD for about 10 years now. The comment that referenced “Drugs” in hearing voices while on Adderall as a side effect, can long consistent term drug use damage the brain enough to lead to conditions like schizophrenia and/or psychosis? Or were they referring to other long term drugs, (not Adderall), since Adderall is supposed to help chemistry unbalance that an ADD person has?

  • Unknown August 7, 2015, 2:37 pm

    My nan passed away in 2013, she had 3 heart attacks within the space of 3 months. The night before the first heart attack, I was in bed half asleep and half awake, and I could hear this lady telling me that my nan’s going to have a heart attack throughout the night and she may even die. Obviously you’re not going to listen to a random voice, so I went to sleep; I got woken up by parents at around 5 in the morning explaining that my nan had a heart attack and they need to get to the hospital right away, and I needed to look after my brothers.

    My nan actually passed away in the ambulance but they bought her back to life. I now believe the voices I hear are true. Last year around February time, I was going out with my ex boyfriend, I encountered a large amount of abuse within the 6 month relationship, which caused me to be diagnosed with Psychotic Depression Syndrome, one night he threw me downstairs and kicked me in my spine (this is still causing me problems now). I ran home and got in bed and began to cry, after I stopped crying, I could hear a voice next to me in bed.

    It was a woman and she whispered ‘Run, Run, Run’ over and over again, it freaked me out and I had no clue what she was talking about. Two months later after we split up, I was walking home from work at five in the morning, he invited me to his house to ‘apologize’ and ‘get back together’, so I went round hoping things would change, but I walked into my own trap and he raped me on the 8th April 2014. I will never forgive myself for not listening to the voices and I will never forgive him.

    I also have visual hallucinations every single day of my life, since last April. There’s always a man in the corner of the room crying and just staring at me; and there’s a woman she looks Victorian, she’s dressed in all black and she has her mouth wide open (like overly wide) and she looks as though shes screaming at me but I can’t hear her.

  • Meepmeep September 1, 2015, 9:26 pm

    I’ve been hearing voices for years as I’m falling asleep. I’ve never been alarmed by it. I actually find them comforting. I will lay awake listening to them until I drift into sleep. : ) It’s hard to make out what is being said sometimes. Usually random.

  • Carrie September 9, 2015, 11:46 pm

    My son told me when he was 4 years old that he would sometimes hear a voice in his head. He had an awesome imagination, so I thought it was just that. He’s 15 now and just told me he still hears (just one voice) but now it is negative, derogatory and tells him what to do. He has always had generalized anxiety, low self esteem and some depression issues. He was bullied chronically from a young age about an overbite, which was repaired, and for the last few years about his sexuality (he has some feminine mannerisms and ideas). I am quite concerned, and feel he should get some help. Please, what advice can you give me?

  • Azam Khattak September 13, 2015, 6:07 am

    I was studying and suddenly I said “Mai Nahi Maanta” which in English means “I don’t believe” and I could hear a bird repeating it several times and When the bird stopped, I said it again and the bird repeated it. I was very much amazed. I think when you hears voices, the nature is trying to convey you a message. It can be positive or negative.

  • Jaz September 17, 2015, 9:34 pm

    I’m 15 years old and I get driven insane with a voice shouting at me whenever I stay quiet for too long (10 mins) e.g. even in English if I’m reading a book… After 10 minutes a violent loud voice shouts at me… I can never work out what it’s saying because in my head I shout back telling it to go away and that I’m scared. When I sleep I hear it too. I have to clench my eyes shut and scream back it scares me so much and it’s happened for a very long time – since as long as I can remember. Any advice? Anyone please, it’s just plain scaring me now.

  • Kelsey September 18, 2015, 4:16 am

    Way back in 2008 when it first started, I had been over my head with stress, the thought I had lost my best friend forever, and some in between feelings of how inadequate I was. I had, in my mind felt the most lowest. I had wanted to commit suicide, anything to get away from the madness. I had been so broken, that I heard this calming, assuring voice.

    Like a whisper. Not from my ear, but from my head. A voice of a woman; to this day I do not know if it’s my own voice. The voice had soothed me, and told me that everything was going to be okay, and that I needed sleep. I felt as if they had been patting my head, and telling me over and over that I was exhausted and wasn’t thinking straight. I listened to the voice. I calmed down. I went to bed. Whenever I am in a complete meltdown and feeling like I can’t continue, that voice appears all over again. Like a whisper.

    Assuring and calming. They have never been violent, or told me to do things that would hurt me. It is always me needing to sleep, me needing to calm down, and that they would help me. To this day, it continues to happen when I’m at my most lowest, or when I don’t think I can continue forward. It has protected me many times, whatever/whoever it is.

  • Amanda September 21, 2015, 5:07 pm

    I hear random voices before falling asleep. Usually if I try to focus on what they’re saying they go away because I wake up a little too much I guess. I haven’t had any trauma in my life so I don’t know why I hear them. They don’t bother me, but I wish I could hear them more clearly, just out of curiosity. It is kind of annoying when I hear them say, “Mom” because I don’t know if it’s them or my kiddos. I kind of think it’s just my brain spewing back all the things I’ve heard that day. Just like an auditory dream before I actually sleep.

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