≡ Menu

Antidepressants List of Names: Alphabetical Order

Antidepressants are medications that were developed to treat major depression. In addition to treating depression, many antidepressants have been found therapeutically beneficial for other conditions such as: anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and insomnia. There are many different types of antidepressants on the market for clinical use. A majority of antidepressants prescribed in the current era include: SSRIs and SNRIs.

However, there are other classes such as: atypical antidepressants, tricyclic antidepressants, and MAOIs that are typically used if a person doesn’t respond to the newer classes of drugs. Included below is a comprehensive list of antidepressants that are currently available for clinical use throughout worldwide markets. Additionally below the initial list is a collection of antidepressant drugs that have been withdrawn from the market.

Antidepressants List of Names: Alphabetical Order

Below are various antidepressants listed by their most common references. In other words, some drugs may be listed as the “brand name” while others may be listed as their chemical name. For example, most people do not call Prozac by the name “Fluoxetine,” so Prozac would be listed.

  • Agomelatine (Valdoxan): A medication utilized in Europe that has been found effective for treating major depression. This is a unique drug because it works primarily on melatonin receptors which is thought to help improve quality of sleep. It has a similar chemical structure to melatonin and does not affect neurotransmitters of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine like other antidepressants.
  • Amitriptyline (Elavil): A tricyclic antidepressant that acts as an SNRI (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor). It has been around since the 1960s and is considered one of the most important medications of its time. It is a very effective treatment option for major depression, and in some cases it demonstrates superiority to SSRIs.
  • Amoxapine (Asendin): A tetracyclic antidepressant that works as an SNRI (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor). It was approved in the United States since 1992, and is believed to work more quickly than other medications. Many of its properties are similar to antipsychotic medications.
  • Anafranil (Clomipramine): A tricyclic antidepressant that acts primarily as an antagonist on histamine receptors and affects serotonin to 200x the extent of norepinephrine. It also is known to affect acetylcholine receptors, and adrenergic receptors. This drug was originally created in the 1960s and is included on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines.
  • Butriptyline (Evadene): A tricyclic antidepressant that is similar to the drug Amitriptyline, but is associated with fewer side effects, increased efficacy, and less contraindications. It has been utilized throughout European countries since 1974 to treat major depression. Butriptyline acts as a potent antihistamine with anticholinergic effects. It inhibits reuptake of serotonin to a minor extent.
  • Brintellix (Vortioxetine): This is an atypical antidepressant that was approved in 2013 for the treatment of major depression in adults. It works primarily as a serotonin modulator and stimulator, effectively increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain. It is thought to affect 5-HT receptors as well as norepinephrine to a lesser extent. Some evidence suggests that it may also be effective for treating anxiety disorders.
  • Celexa (Citalopram): An SSRI antidepressant that is utilized to treat major depression in the United States. It has been on the market since 1998 and is considered average in regards to both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in comparison studies. Celexa contains both an R-stereoisomer and an S-stereoisomer, but the “R” portion is believed to have no effect for depression. Hence an updated version of the drug called Lexapro was created with only the active S-stereoisomer.
  • Cymbalta (Duloxetine): This is an SNRI drug that functions by increasing the amount of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain by inhibiting their reuptake. It affects serotonin to a 10x greater extent than that of norepinephrine. It was initially approved to treat major depression and diabetic neuropathy in 2004. It has since been approved for fibromyalgia, generalized anxiety, musculoskeletal pain, and urinary incontinence. In recent years it has been among the most prescribed and top selling psychiatric drugs of 2014.
  • Desipramine (Norpramin): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that works primarily by inhibiting reuptake of norepinephrine, but also affects serotonin. Its primary use is to treat major depression, but it also has been found effective in reducing neuropathic pain. It carries less sedating side effects than other tricyclics, but is linked to increased risk of breast cancer and genotoxicity.
  • Dosulepin (Prothiaden): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that is utilized in Australia, Europe, and South Asia. It is approved to treat major depression as well as neuropathic pain. It functions primarily as an SNRI (selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor), but also acts as an antihistamine and anticholinergic.
  • Doxepin (Sinequan): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that is utilized for the treatment of major depression, anxiety disorders, and insomnia. It works primarily as a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It should also be noted that Doxepin has been found effective for treating eczema and neurodermatitis and also comes in a topical formula to treat these conditions.
  • Effexor (Venlafaxine): A drug classified as an SNRI that is prescribed to treat major depression. It works by preventing the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. The ratio of serotonin to norepinephrine reuptake inhibition is approximately 30:1. It is regarded as being an older version of the drug Pristiq, which contains a synthetic form of Effexor’s primary active metabolite. In addition to treating major depression, it has also been approved to treat generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and panic attacks.
  • Etoperidone (Axiomin): This is an antidepressant that was first marketed throughout Europe in 1977. It functions as an antagonist at 5-HT receptors and various adrenergic receptors. It is sometimes referred to as “clopradone” and “triazolinone” and is referenced as a member of the phenylpiperazine class.
  • Fetzima (Levomilnacipran): This is an SNRI drug that was approved in 2013 to treat major depression in the United States. It works by inhibiting reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. Fetzima differs from other SNRIs in that it affects reuptake of norepinephrine to 2x the extent of serotonin; all other SNRIs affect serotonin to a greater extent. It is similar to the drug Savella (Milnacipran) as it contains the levo-stereoisomer and results in similar effects.
  • Imipramine (Tofranil): This is regarded as being the very first tricyclic antidepressant and emerged in the 1950s. It is primarily utilized to treat major depression and in some cases nocturnal bedwetting in children. It has an effect on a variety of neurotransmitters including: serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, histamine, acetylcholine, and epinephrine. Structurally, this drug is comparable to several muscle relaxants.
  • Iprindole (Prondol): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that is utilized to treat major depression in European countries. It works primarily as an antagonist at 5-HT2 receptors without having much effect on serotonin and norepinephrine. It has been around since 1967 and is considered the very first “second-generation” antidepressant medication. Iprindole is considered well-tolerated, but its efficacy is thought to be lower than other tricyclics.
  • Lexapro (Escitalopram): An SSRI antidepressant that has been approved since 2002 to treat major depression in the United States. It is considered an improved version of the antidepressant Celexa due to the fact that it contains the only active stereoisomer. Lexapro contains the active S-stereoisomer found in the drug Celexa, but whether it is a actually a more effective drug is up for debate. It has also been approved for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among adults.
  • Lofepramine (Feprapax / Gamanil / Lomont): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that was initially marketed in 1983 to treat major depression in the United Kingdom. It works as an SNRI, but affects norepinephrine to a greater extent than serotonin. It is regarded as being safer in the event of overdose and less sedating than other tricyclic antidepressants.
  • Luvox (Fluvoxamine): An SSRI medication that was introduced to the United States for the treatment of major depression in 1994. It is considered one of the first SSRIs and can also treat OCD, PTSD, and panic disorders. In addition to increasing the amount of serotonin in receptors, it also functions as an Sigma-1 receptor agonist, which may contribute to its antidepressant properties. It is regarded as being the first SSRI approved for treating OCD.
  • Maprotiline (Ludiomil): A tetracyclic antidepressant that functions as a NRI (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) and histamine antagonist, affecting serotonin and dopamine to a minimal extent. In addition to having antidepressant properties, it also can act as an anxiolytic as well as a sedative. It is considered very effective for depression with comorbid anxiety and at high doses can have an effect on serotonin.
  • Marplan (Isocarboxazid): This is an MAOI antidepressant and is considered a hydrazine with irreversible and non-selective properties. Like other MAOIs, it works by increasing levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the brain. This drug is typically prescribed to treat major depression and anxiety, but has been thought to potentially help neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s. Despite its efficacy, this drug is typically only utilized as a last-line treatment option due to side effects.
  • Melitracen (Adaptol / Dixeran / Thymeol): A tricyclic antidepressant that is utilized to treat major depression and anxiety disorders throughout Europe and Japan. It is thought to function similarly to other tricyclic antidepressants including: Amitriptyline and Imipramine. It is known for working quickly and being well-tolerated compared to other drugs in the tricyclic class.
  • Metralindole (Inkazan): This was an MAOI drug with reversible properties that was initially tested in Russia. It is very similar to the drug Pirlindole. Unfortunately there is not much research that has been released regarding this drug.
  • Mianserin (Lerivon / Norval / Tolvon): A tetracyclic antidepressant that can be classified as an NaSSA (noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant). Although it is not approved in the United States, it is very similar to the drug Remeron. Mianserin carries anxiolytic, antihistamine, and sedative effects. When the drug was first marketed in the UK, it was considered to be safer than other antidepressants in regards to overdose.
  • Moclobemide (Aurorix / Manerix): This is an MAOI drug with reversible inhibition properties that is utilized to treat major depression and anxiety disorders. Although it is not approved in the U.S., it is used in Australia and the United Kingdom. It is considered among the safest MAOI drugs and compared to most other antidepressants, it has a favorable side effect profile. This is considered a quick-acting drug and works by increasing serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the brain.
  • Nardil (Phenelzine): This is a non-selective MAOI with irreversible properties of the hydrazine class. It is typically used to treat major depression, but can also be used for anxiety disorders. It is regarded as one of a few MAOIs that are still prescribed to treat mood disorders. It works like other MAOIs by increasing the amount of neurotransmitters such as: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the brain. The inactive ingredients in the formulation were changed in 2003, causing an uproar among many who were taking the drug (Read: Old Nardil vs. New Nardil).
  • Nortriptyline (Pamelor): A tricyclic antidepressant that is utilized to treat major depression and to a lesser extent, childhood bedwetting. This drug is believed to affect norepinephrine, histamine, and serotonin to a significant extent. It should be noted that this drug is an active metabolite of Amitriptyline.
  • Opipramol (Insidon): This is a drug that functions as a sigma-receptor agonist that is utilized to treat major depression and anxiety disorders in Europe. It is regarded as being a tricyclic antidepressant, but it works differently than other tricyclics. Most people who take this drug note significant sedation during the first few weeks of treatment. The sedation is a result of Opipramol’s prominent antihistamine properties.
  • Parnate (Tranylcypromine): This is an MAOI drug with both irreversible and non-selective properties. It is one of a select few MAOIs that are still on the market for clinical use. It is primarily used to treat major depression, but also has anxiolytic properties, making it effective at treating some forms of anxiety. It works by increasing levels of norepinephrine and dopamine, and is considered similar to amphetamines, but only 10% as potent.
  • Paxil (Paroxetine): An SSRI antidepressant that has a variety of uses besides treating major depression including treatment for OCD, panic attacks, social anxiety, PTSD, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). It was introduced to the market in 1992 and is considered one of the most potent medications for treating anxiety. Additionally Paxil is documented as having among the worst discontinuation symptoms and is the only SSRI proven to cause birth defects.
  • Pirlindole (Pirazidol): This is an MAOI with reversible inhibition properties that was developed in Russia. It is regarded as being very similar to Metralindole, another drug of the same class that was also researched in Russia. It should be noted that there isn’t much published research regarding this particular drug.
  • Pristiq (Desvenlafaxine): An SNRI antidepressant that is marketed as being an improved version of the drug Effexor. Pristiq contains the primary active metabolite of Effexor, and functions by preventing the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. It affects serotonin 10x to that of norepinephrine, whereas Effexor affects serotonin 30x to that of norepinephrine. It is also being investigated to help with menopause as a non-hormonal treatment.
  • Protriptyline (Vivactil): A tricyclic antidepressant that can be prescribed to treat both major depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is different from many other tricyclic antidepressants because it tends to yield stimulating effects as opposed to sedating ones. In some cases this drug is utilized as a wakefulness-promoting agent among individuals with narcolepsy. It tends to primarily reduce reuptake of norepinephrine and slightly affects serotonin. As of the year 2000, this drug was withdrawn from Australia and the UK.
  • Prozac (Fluoxetine): An SSRI medication that was first approved to treat major depression in 1987. It functions primarily by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin and thus increasing the amount of serotonin in synapses. It is regarded as one of the most popular antidepressants of all time and is included on World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. It is also used as a treatment option for eating disorders, panic disorders, and trichotillomania.
  • Reboxetine (Edronax / Prolift): This is an antidepressant that functions as an NRI (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor). It is marketed to treat major depression, but is also sometimes prescribed for panic attacks as well as ADHD. It is a fairly popular drug, but is only approved in countries outside of the United States. Some research has suggested that the efficacy of Reboxetine is questionable as a treatment for major depression.
  • Remeron (Mirtazapine): An atypical antidepressant of the tetracyclic class, this drug functions as an NaSSA (noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant). It has been utilized in the U.S. since 1996 and is regarded as being very effective for major depression. It is considered being of similar structure to the drug Mianserin. This drug is known to increase appetite, decrease anxiety, and has sedating effects.
  • Savella (Milnacipran): This is an SNRI drug that is primarily utilized to treat fibromyalgia, but has been approved for major depression in countries outside the United States. It works by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. It appears to affect norepinephrine reuptake inhibition 3x the extent of serotonin. In comparison analyses with SSRI medications, Savella was regarded as having similar discontinuation rates, efficacy, side effects, and tolerability.
  • Selegiline (Emsam): This is a drug that is prescribed to treat early stages of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and dementia. Years later (2006) it was eventually approved for the treatment of major depression in the form of a transdermal patch. It is classified as an MAOI drug with selective and irreversible properties. It works primarily on increasing MAO-B, resulting in more of an effect on dopamine and cognition.
  • Setiptiline (Tecipul): A tetracyclic antidepressant that functions as an NaSSA (noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant). It was developed in Japan to treat major depression in 1989 and is considered similar to both Mianserin and Remeron.
  • Stablon (Tianeptine): This is an SSRE (selective serotonin reuptake enhancer) drug that was created primarily to treat major depression, but also has anxiolytic properties. Based on chemical structure, it fits into the tricyclic class of antidepressants, but has different effects than other tricyclic drugs. Most research suggests that this drug works to enhance the reuptake of serotonin and affect NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors. It is also unique in that it affects both delta and mu opioid receptors.
  • Tandospirone (Sediel): This drug is an antidepressant that is primarily used in China and Japan. In addition to being utilized to treat major depression, it can also be used for generalized anxiety disorder. Its activity as a partial agonist at the 5-HT1A receptor makes it similar to Buspar and a potent anxiolytic. It has also been researched and found to yield improvement in cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia.
  • Teniloxazine (Lucelan / Metatone): This is a drug that was initially thought to have nootropic and neuroprotective effects, but later discovered to have antidepressant properties. It ended up being marketed as an antidepressant in Japan and acts as a NRI (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor). It also acts as an antagonist at the 5-HT2A receptor, with less effects on serotonin and dopamine.
  • Tofenacin (Elamol / Tofacine / Tofalin): This is an SNRI drug that was marketed throughout the UK and Italy from 1971 to 1981 for major depression. It is known for antihistamine and anticholinergic effects and works primarily by preventing reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. It contains the active metabolite of the drug Orphenadrine, which is used for muscle spasms and to reduce symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.
  • Toloxatone (Humoryl): This is an antidepressant that was marketed throughout France in 1984. It is classified as an MAOI with reversible inhibition properties and primarily affects MAO-A. It works by increasing levels of various neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the brain.
  • Trazodone (Desyrel): This is classified as an atypical antidepressant that functions as a SARI (serogonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor). It is typically prescribed to treat major depression, anxiety disorder, and sometimes insomnia. It functions primarily by affecting the 5-HT2A receptor as an antagonist, resulting in anxiolytic and sedative effects. It doesn’t inhibit the reuptake of serotonin very well and is considered to have different properties than SSRIs. Additionally it is associated with less weight gain and increased appetite as side effects.
  • Trimipramine (Surmontil): This is a tricyclic antidepressant that carries significant antihistamine properties. It is utilized mostly to treat major depression, but can also be prescribed for insomnia and anxiety. It is documented as having some antipsychotic effects, but not to a significant extent. This drug does have a significant affect on serotonin, norepinephrine, or dopamine levels.
  • Viibryd (Vilazodone): This is an antidepressant that works as an SRI (serotonin-reuptake inhibitor) as well as a partial agonist at the 5-HT1A receptor. It is formally classified as a “serotonin modulator and stimulator” (SMS). In 2011, it was approved to treat major depression in the United States. It is considered different than SSRIs due to the fact that it affects 5-HT1A as a partial agonist (like Abilify and Buspar). Preliminary evidence suggests that it may be less likely to cause weight gain and sexual dysfunction compared to other serotonergic antidepressants.
  • Viloxazine (Vivalan / Emovit): This is an antidepressant that works as an NRI (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor). It was approved for the treatment of major depression in various European countries including: England, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. It is considered a “bicyclic” antidepressant because it is a compound with two stereoisomers: an S-stereoisomer and an R-stereoisomer. The drug has also been investigated to treat alcoholism and to prevent bedwetting among children.
  • Wellbutrin (Bupropion): This is an atypical antidepressant that has been on the market since 1991 to treat major depression. It is also commonly utilized to help with smoking cessation and tends to have stimulating effects. It functions as an NDRI, but is thought to influence norepinephrine more than dopamine. Additionally Wellbutrin can cause weight loss as opposed to weight gain associated with most antidepressants. In many cases, it is prescribed with as a common antidepressant augmentation strategy to offset unwanted side effects caused by SSRIs.
  • Zoloft (Sertraline): An SSRI antidepressant that was originally marketed in 1991 to treat major depression in adults. It works primarily by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin and is considered to be a more stimulating SSRI. This drug is also commonly prescribed to treat: social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and panic attacks. In 2011 it was regarded as the second-most popular antidepressant in the United States.

Other Antidepressants

There are many antidepressants that were developed, but have been removed from the market due to being associated with potentially dangerous side effects. Below is a list of all antidepressants that are no longer utilized to treat depression.

  • Amineptine (Survector / Maneon): This was a tricyclic antidepressant that functioned primarily as an NDRI (norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor). It was created in the 1960s and marketed in 1978 to treat depression. It worked differently than most other antidepressants due to the fact that it primarily inhibited the reuptake of dopamine, with less effect on norepinephrine. It would eventually get withdrawn from the market due to cases of liver damage as well as its abuse potential.
  • Benmoxin (Neuralex): This drug was an MAOI that was created in 1967 and utilized throughout Europe. It was a member of the hydrazine class and contained non-selective and irreversible properties. It was eventually withdrawn from the market, likely due to being a hydrazine and having dangerous side effects.
  • Caroxazone (Surodil / Timostenil): This drug was formerly used as an antidepressant but has been discontinued. It functioned as MAOI with reversible inhibition properties. It worked on both MAO-A and MAO-B, but affected MAO-B significantly more. Many drugs like this have been discontinued due to adverse effects and/or potential of liver damage.
  • Eprobemide (Befol): This is an MAOI drug that was primarily utilized throughout Russia to treat major depression. It had reversible inhibition properties and primarily affected serotonin. Eprobemide was eventually withdrawn from the market in 2005. It was very similar to the drug Moclobemide, but differed in that it contained one more carbon atom.
  • Etryptamine (Monase): This antidepressant is considered a non-selective serotonin agonist as well as an SNDRA (serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent). It was initially created to be an antidepressant in the 1960s, but was discovered to have stimulating and psychedelic properties with some effects similar to MDMA. It was withdrawn from the market due to causing decreases in white blood cell count. In the United States it is considered a “Schedule I” illegal substance meaning that it has a high potential for abuse with no accepted medical use.
  • Iproclozide (Sursum): An MAOI medication that was primarily used to treat major depression. It was a member of the hydrazine class of MAOIs and was inevitably removed from the market due to causing acute liver failure. There were several deaths reported as a result of using this antidepressant.
  • Iproniazid (Marsilid): This functioned as an MAOI drug of the hydrazine class and was considered both non-selective and irreversible. It was approved for use in 1958, but was pulled from most markets in the 1960s due to reported cases of liver damage. It should be noted that many consider this the first antidepressant to ever be sold on a mainstream scale.
  • Mebanazine (Actomol): This was an MAOI drug that became available for clinical use in the 1960s, but was eventually discontinued. The problem with hydrazine MAOIs like Mebanazine is that many caused dangerous effects such as liver damage. Nearly all non-selective and irreversible MAOIs have been found problematic.
  • Medifoxamine (Cledial / Gerdaxyl): This antidepressant functioned primarily as a DRI (dopamine reuptake inhibitor) with other activity as an antagonist at the 5-HT2A receptor. There aren’t many notable dopamine-reuptake inhibitors on the market to treat depression, but relief from symptoms may support the idea that dopamine can contribute to depression (read: Depression: Dopamine vs. Serotonin). This drug was only utilized in France, and was eventually taken off the market due to causing liver damage.
  • Metryptamine (Indopan): This is an MAOI drug similar to Etryptamine and functions as a SNDRA (serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent) that also functions as a non-selective serotonin receptor agonist. It was developed in the 1960s, but was eventually removed from the market. Taking this drug resulted in psychedelic and stimulant-like euphoric effects, inevitably leading the U.S. to classify it as a “Schedule I” controlled substance in 2004.
  • Minaprine (Brantur / Cantor): This was an MAOI antidepressant that was primarily utilized throughout France. In 1996, its production was eventually discontinued due to the fact that it caused seizures. It was thought to act primarily on MAO-A with reversible inhibition, which would result in increased levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine.
  • Nialamide (Niamid): Another MAOI with non-selective and irreversible properties that was of hydrazine classification. It was used primarily to treat major depression, but would be removed from the market due to increased risk of liver damage. Nearly all of the hydrazine-based MAOIs have since been taken off the market.
  • Nomifensine (Merital / Alival): This is an NDRI (norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor) that was initially created in the 1960s. It works primarily by preventing reuptake of norepinephrine and dopamine neurotransmission. It was originally researched throughout the 1970s and was regarded as an effective antidepressant with minimal side effects. It was removed from the market in 1992 due to being associated with a decrease in red blood cells.
  • Octamoxin (Ximaol): This was another hydrazine MAOI that was available to treat major depression in the 1960s. When researchers discovered that hydrazine-based MAOIs were causing liver damage and other dangerous side effects , Octamoxin was removed from the market.
  • Oxaflozane (Conflictan): This is an antidepressant that was originally marketed throughout France in 1982. It was utilized to treat major depression and acted as an agonist at various 5-HT receptors. It was eventually withdrawn from the market and is no longer manufactured in any country.
  • Pheniprazine (Catron): An MAOI of the hydrazine class that was used to treat major depression throughout the 1960s. In some cases this drug was used to help treat various symptoms of schizophrenia. It was eventually withdrawn from the market due to causing eye damage and jaundice.
  • Phenoxypropazine (Drazine): This is a hydrazine-based MAOI drug that was approved in 1960 to treat major depression. Like most other irreversible and non-selective hydrazines, it was eventually discontinued due to causing liver damage.
  • Pivhydrazine (Tersavid): This was another MAOI of hydrazine classification that was around in the 1960s. It carried irreversible and non-selective properties, and was removed from the market due to potentially adverse side effects. Most people were concerned that it could damage the liver.
  • Safrazine (Safra): Like other MAOIs, Safrazine was introduced in the 1960s. It carried irreversible inhibition properties and was non-selective. The drug was removed from the market due to concerns regarding liver damage.
  • Upstene (Indalpine): An SSRI drug that was initially marketed in France, and eventually prescribed on a worldwide basis in 1982. When it was released, it was considered highly successful and a breakthrough in the treatment of depression. It functioned primarily by increasing the amount of serotonin in synapses throughout the brain. Upstene was eventually withdrawn from the market due to concerns over potential adverse effects; particularly regarding blood cell abnormalities.
  • Zelmid (Zimelidine): This drug was regarded as the very first SSRI antidepressant to be marketed. It was created throughout the 1970s and was approved in the early 1980s. It functioned primarily as an antihistamine with antidepressant properties. In terms of structure, it is different from other drugs in that it is a pyridylallylamine. Despite being considered a relatively safe drug, it was withdrawn from the market due to reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Related Posts:

{ 0 comments… add one }

Leave a Comment